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Stress Tests
A stress test can help determine-

  • If an artery in your heart is blocked
  • If exercise is causing any abnormal heart rhythm
  • How well your body can tolerate exercise

Treadmill Stress (Plain Exercise) Test (Takes about 1 hour)

  • No food for 4 hours before the test. You may have water in moderation until test time.  No caffeine or caffeinated beverages for 12 hours.
  • A regular cardiac exercise stress test is a painless, minimally invasive test. This test measures electrical (EKG/ECG) changes to your heart during exercise stress. You will have an I.V. started for this test.

Exercise (Treadmill) Stress Test with Nuclear Isotype

  • This test can be done in one or two days.
  • To determine if you qualify for a one day or two day stress test, your Body Mass Index (BMI) which is the ratio between your height and weight will be taken into consideration.
  • Total test time is 2-4 hours.
  • No food for 4 hours before the test. You may have water in moderation until test time.  No caffeine or caffeinated beverages for 12 hours. The Nuclear Stress/Rest Test is done to check how the blood supply gets to your heart muscle at stress and rest. The results help your doctor diagnose coronary artery disease.
  • For stress test: You will be exercising on a treadmill. Once you achieve peak exercise, you will be injected with a small amount of nuclear isotope through an IV. Imaging with a gamma camera will follow shortly after.
  • For the resting nuclear images: You will be injected with a small amount of nuclear isotope and pictures will follow approximately one hour later.
  • Some medications may need to be held. Please contact your physician’s office.

Medicated Stress Test with Nuclear Isotope

  • This can be done in one or two days.
  • To determine if you qualify for a one day or two day stress test, your Body Mass Index (BMI) which is the ratio between your height and weight will be taken into consideration.
  • Total test time is 3-6 hours.
  • No food for 4 hours before the test. You may have water in moderation until test time.  No caffeine or caffeinated products for 12 hours. This includes food, beverages and medication that contain caffeine.The Nuclear Stress/Rest Test is done to check how the blood supply gets to your heart  muscle at stress and rest. The results help your doctor diagnose coronary artery disease.
    For stress test: If you are unable to perform an exercise stress test, you will be given a medication through an IV followed by small amount of nuclear isotope. Imaging with a gamma camera will follow after approximately one hour.
    For resting nuclear images: You will be injected with a small amount of nuclear isotope and pictures will follow approximately one hour later.
  • Some medications may need to be held. Please contact your physician’s office.

Stress Echocardiogram with Treadmill or Medication

  • No food for 4 hours before the test. You may have water in moderation until test time.  No caffeine or caffeinated products for 12 hours. This includes food, beverages and medication that contain caffeine. No food for 4 hours before the test. Limited water
    Takes about 2 hours
    A stress echocardiogram is a diagnostic procedure that may be used when a doctor wants to assess the heart muscle under stress. The patient is prepped for the exercise stress. You will have an I.V. started for your exam and may need to have an I.V. contrast agent given for better image quality. Echo images are done at rest conditions and at peak exercise. The exercise stress begins and immediately following the echo images will begin to capture the echocardiogram of heart under stress conditions. Those patients who are unable to do walk on the treadmill will be given a medication to increase the heart rate.

HUTT (Head Up Tilt Table Test)

  • Takes about 2 hours
  • No food or water for 6 hours before the test
    A Head Up Tilt Table Test is used to evaluate the cause of unexplained fainting (syncope). During a HUTT, you lie on table that moves from a horizontal to a vertical position. Your ECG, heart rate and blood pressure are monitored through the tilt table test. You will have an I.V. started for this test.

Echocardiogram

  • Takes about 30 minutes
    An echocardiogram is a procedure used to assess the heart’s function and structures. During the procedure, a transducer (like a microphone) sends out ultrasonic sound waves at a frequency too high to be heard. When the transducer is placed on the chest at certain locations and angles the ultrasonic sounds waves move through the skin and other body tissues to the heart tissues, where the waves bounce or “echo” off of the heart structures. The transducer picks up the reflected waves and sends them to a computer. The computer displays the echoes as images of the heart walls and valves. You may have an I.V. started if an I.V. contrast agent is needed for better image quality.
  • A heart monitor may be ordered by your physician to wear as an outpatient.

4D Echocardgiography

  • Provides enhanced crisp image quality that is so precise it produces never-before-seen details of your heart.

CARDIAC PET/CT 690

  • Non-invasively detects coronary artery blockages with greater accuracy and less radiation exposure.
  • Cardiac PET/CT gives doctors similar results that a more invasive cardiac catheterization test would give. It is a valuable non-invasive test that is used to determine if a patient has heart disease, the severity of the disease, and what treatment is recommended.

SPEC CT

  • Enables stress testing at low patient radiation dose levels with lower artifacts and shorter exam times.